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How to Backup Games/Apps/APKs (Including Saving Data) of your Android Device?

Android logoJust about yesterday, I’ve already showed you how exactly to create the backup system of your Android tablet/smartphone by using a powerful tool called ‘ClockWorkMod’ or popularly known in Android tech world as CWM.

And you already know what CWM really is, as I’ve explained to you as well in my other previous post that discussed many stuff related to this custom recovery mode:
  • From the definition of CMW
  • The differences between CUSTOM recovery mode and STANDARD recovery mode
  • The benefits of having CWM on your Android device
  • Including my step-by-step guide to install CWM and create the backup system out of this custom recovery tool
Anyway, as the continuation from my previous post about creating the backup system with ClockWorkMod, today I’m gonna share to you how exactly to backup each APK of the games and apps you’ve already installed on your Android device before starting the process of creating backup system with ClockWorkMod.

And I think this is really important to do because you may want to keep 'backup file' SMALL in size (like around 2GB) so later, that 'backup file' can fit perfectly either in your internal storage/external storage.

Okay, right now, I’m about to show you exactly how to safe or backup each APK file of the games or apps you currently have on your Android device before even doing the process of creating backup system with CWM.

You know, so you can uninstall some heavy games or apps in the system in order to keep the 'backup file' SMALL in size.

Well, without further ado, below you’ll find 2 of the apps that I currently use to backup some heavy games/apps (APK files) on my phablet.

Titanium Backup (Requires rooted device)

Some of you guys here probably are already familiar with one app called Titanium Backup.

But if this is your first time knowing about this app, so Titanium Backup, as its name suggests, is indeed an app, or tool if you would, that basically has the main job to backup each of the app you currently have on your tablet/smartphone.

But the cool thing about Titanium Backup is, not only can you make the backup of each app/game on your smartphone/tablet, but there are also many other actions that you can apply on those apps using Titanium Backup, like:
  • freezing up the apps (disable),
  • converting the apps to the system,
  • uninstalling system apps
  • wiping data and caches of apps
  • moving to external microSD card
  • and even applying ‘multiplayer profiles’ on each of the apps
However, Titanium Backup requires you to have a rooted device in order for it to work.

So if your Android tablet/smartphone hasn’t been rooted yet, then this app cannot work.

This is why, if you haven’t figured out how exactly to root your Android device, I strongly recommend you to go visit XDA-developers.com as this website forum has huge database of information especially about how to root any Android devices available on the market all over the world.

Backing up games and apps using Titanium Backup

Anyway, if you want to backup each of the apps/games using Titanium Backup, it’s actually pretty simple to do.

1. Grant the root permission to Titanium Backup

I assume that right now, you’ve already rooted your tablet/smartphone and it’s also been validated by an app called ‘Root Checker’ that your device has been successfully rooted.

Root checker to check root access

So right when you just open Titanium Backup, some messages will be prompted on the screen. These messages mostly are asking you to grant this app the rooting access of your device.

For example, like this one (but I'm using 'Root File Manager' below just as an example).

allow the root access of Android app

Now select ‘Allow’ on the prompted options, which means you’re giving this Titanium Backup the root permission of your device, so it can have the ability to explore the root system of your device.

Okay, I know this sounds so complicated. But basically, by giving this app the root access of your device, Titanium Backup is now allowed to do things, like:
  • uninstalling system apps, 
  • moving apps to external microSD card, 
  • creating backup of apps, 
  • etc.
2. Select 'Backup/Restore'

Titanium Backup: How to Backup Games and Apps (APK files) on your Tablet/Smartphone?

Now on the screen, there will be 3 main tabs on the top of the app. And they are:
  • ‘Overview’, 
  • ‘Backup/Restore’ 
  • and ‘Schedules’. 
Meanwhile, on the bottom position, there are 3 other extra tabs for:
  • ‘Check for Updates’, 
  • ‘Problems?’ 
  • and ‘PRO VERSION: $5.99’.
If you want to access all the installed apps/games on your device, you just need to press the tab ‘Backup/Restore’.

3. Choose the app or game you want to backup!

Now scroll down and find the most important apps/games that you want to backup.

Titanium Backup: How to Backup Games and Apps (APK files) on your Tablet/Smartphone?

For example, in this experiment, I want to backup Mozilla Firefox because I don’t want to lose everything on this web browser, like bookmarks, history, search queries, password, etc.

4. Tap the app to pop up the options to backup

So then I tap on the Firefox app.

Titanium Backup: How to Backup Games and Apps (APK files) on your Tablet/Smartphone?


After pressing the Firefox app, there will be a new window prompted to the screen showing a bunch of options/actions that I can apply on this app, from:
  • backing up,
  • freezing,
  • uninstalling, 
  • running app, 
  • wiping data, 
  • restoring and deleting.
And all of these are found on the first tab of the prompted window ‘Backup Properties’.

Meanwhile, on the second tab, ‘Special features’, there are many other tasks that I can also apply on the app, like: forcing close the app, assigning labels, clearing cache, moving to SDcard and many more.

Titanium Backup: How to Backup Games and Apps (APK files) on your Tablet/Smartphone?


5. Select 'BACKUP'!

So now that I want to create a backup of the app, then I can go back to first ‘Backup properties’ tab and then press 'BACKUP'.

Titanium Backup: How to Backup Games and Apps (APK files) on your Tablet/Smartphone?


6. Wait for the process to complete

Bear in mind though, the process of creating backup of the app will depend on the size of the app/game itself.

So if you are trying to backup small-sized apps like Firefox, Opera mini or Instagram, then process usually only takes a few minutes (even seconds).

7. Free up some space on your internal storage before doing backup

Anyway, if the games you’re trying to backup are huge in size (like GTA Vice City, Modern Combat 4, etc), then the process can take a while though. 

You’re also gonna need to free up some space on external storage/internal storage because the ‘backup file’ of that game, once it’s finished being generated by Titanium Backup, is gonna take some space on your external/internal storage.

So this is why, before even creating the backup of some heavy games with Titanium Backup, I strongly recommend you to move some of your huge files (like videos, photos, mp3s, etc) to your PC or USB flash disk.

8. Restore the app in the future if you accidentally delete it

Okay, back to the process of backing up of Mozilla Firefox app. Once the backup is done being created by the app, now there will be a new button added, 'RESTORE'.

Titanium Backup: How to Backup Games and Apps (APK files) on your Tablet/Smartphone?

So if you accidentally remove/uninstall the Mozilla Firefox in the future:
  • you can just open Titanium Backup, press the tab ‘Backup/Restore’, 
  • find the Mozilla Firefox app in the list (which now has been strikethrough) 
  • and then in the prompted ‘Backup properties’ window, press the option ‘Restore’. 



Titanium Backup: How to Backup Games and Apps (APK files) on your Tablet/Smartphone?
Once it’s pressed, the app will ask you whether you want to install: APP ONLY, DATA ONLY or you want to install the APP + DATA you’ve already stored before (like bookmarks, history, etc) on your device.

I strongly recommend you to select the THIRD option, ‘APK + DATA’ so the app can reinstall the Firefox app along with its old data.

And this means, once it’s brought back to life, this Firefox app will go back to the normal condition where everything like bookmarks, pinned websites, history or logged in account, is still there as it used to be.

Backing up the apps/games (APK) with X-plore

Okay, after learning how to backup your apps and games using Titanium Backup, next I also want to show you the other app that I use to backup each of my important apps/games on my phablet.

So the app I'm referring here is the one called X-plore.

X-plore, as its name suggests, is basically just a normal file explorer or file manager that you’re already familiar to see on your device.

So yes, with X-plore, you can do things like: cutting/copying/pasting documents or files, as well as exploring documents and editing text files on your device.

However, the awesome thing about X-plore is, it has the capability to backup each of the apps/games you’ve already installed on your device, which is pretty rare to find on other file manager apps across the Google Play Store.

1. Let's create the backup of your apps!

Backing up the apps/games using X-plore is actually much simpler than with Titanium Backup.

So in X-plore, the window is split into 2 screens. But basically, each of the screen indicates the position where you’re about to use as the place or destination for the files you want to move or copy.

X-plore: How to Backup Games and Apps (APK files) on your Tablet/Smartphone?X-plore: How to Backup Games and Apps (APK files) on your Tablet/Smartphone?


I mean, if you set the first screen (left screen) as internal storage while the second (right screen) is external storage, then it means, you can move any file from internal to the external microSD or the other way around just simply by swiping the screen from left to right or vice versa. 

X-plore: How to Backup Games and Apps (APK files) on your Tablet/Smartphone?X-plore: How to Backup Games and Apps (APK files) on your Tablet/Smartphone?


And if you’ve already found the files that you want to move or copy, you can simply press the file for 2 seconds and then, select the option ‘Copy’ or ‘Move’ on the prompted window (you can also ‘Create Zip’, ‘Delete’, ‘Show Details’ or ‘Play’).

Anyway, back to the topic about creating the backup of games/apps.

X-plore: How to Backup Games and Apps (APK files) on your Tablet/Smartphone?


So on the default screen, there will be some options of storage that you can explore from your device, like:
  • /sdcard (SD card)
  • /storage/sdcard1 (Phone storage)
  • / (Root)
  • LAN
  • Web Storage
  • App manager
  • DLNA
  • And ‘Show’
2. Select 'App Manager'

In order to create the backup of games/apps that you currently have on your device, now select the option ‘App manager’.

The new list will be opened showing you all of the installed games/apps on your device.

3. Find the apps/games you want to backup

Okay, for example, you want to backup Mozilla Firefox (again, just for an example) and copy the APK file of this app in your external microSD card.

4. Tap the app for 2 seconds

Now scroll down the list and find the ‘Firefox’ app.

Once you’ve found it, press the ‘Firefox’ app for 2 seconds and then select the option ‘Copy’.

5. Copy the app/game to SD card

On the next prompted window, you will be asked by the system whether you want to copy the file or move the file.

DON’T CHECK OFF the small box on the left here because you just want to copy the APK file of Mozilla Firefox app to external sdcard, not moving/cutting the app.

So, just leave the box untouched!

6. Wait for the process to complete

The process of backing up the APK file of Mozilla Firefox is actually really quick as this app is not heavy in size (around 40MB).

But on the other hand, if you’re trying to copy some heavy games like Modern Combat 4 or Asphalt 8: Airborne, then the process can take a while though because these 2 games are really heavy in size (around 2 to 3 GB if I’m not mistaken).

7. Congrats! You've successfully created the backup of the app!

Well, there you go! You’ve successfully backed up the Mozilla Firefox (apk file) into your external microSD card.

So if later in the future, you want to reinstall that app again, then you can just simply press/execute the APK file that you just copied earlier with X-plore in your SD card.

But bear in mind that, once the app is installed, Mozilla Firefox will NOT come with your old data like bookmarks, history, pinned websites, etc.

So this is why, if you want to create the backup of this app along with all of its data, then you might want to use Titanium Backup instead.

However, Titanium Backup requires you to have a rooted device in order to use this app. So if you haven’t rooted your device yet, then you cannot use this app.

Meanwhile, X-plore DOESN’T require you to root your device in order for this app to work.

So you can still backup the games/apps (APKs) to your external SD card without rooting your tablet/smartphone. But of course, the save/data/cache of the apps will be reset to default.

Conclusion

Well, there you go. My tips to backup your apps/games of your device.

I really hope my tips on this page can really help you solve your problem to back up your favorite games/apps before doing the process of creating backup system with ClockWorkMod.

But you can also follow this guide if you feel that it’s time for you to rest some of the heavy games on your device in order to free up some space on internal/external storage.

So you can install some other new heavy games on your tablet/smartphone.

Anyway, that’s all for today! Don’t forget to share this post to your friends on Twitter or Facebook! I would totally appreciate it!

How to backup the system of Android Tablet/Smartphone with CWM (ClockWorkMod)?

Android logoYesterday, I’ve already given you my step-by-step guide of installing the custom recovery mode on your Android tablet/smartphone with one very powerful recovery mode called ClockWorkMod, which you're probably more familiar with around the Android tech world as CWM.

So basically, this CUSTOM recovery mode (CWM) replaces the STANDARD recovery mode that already comes out of the box on any Android tablet/smartphone available on the market today.

However, what makes CWM so awesome than the STANDARD recovery mode is its capability to create a backup system of not only your data on internal storage, but also the ENTIRE Android system of your device (like apps, games, logged in accounts, web bookmarks, homescreen layout, etc).

And this is a very powerful feature that STANDARD recovery mode CANNOT DO.

So if something goes wrong with your Android tablet/smartphone in the future, like for example:
  • your tablet won’t boot up to the normal homescreen
  • or it keeps rebooting over and over again in the intro/logo (known as bootloop)
then you don’t need to worry anything because you can just restore back your device to normal again with the backup system you’ve already created before using CWM custom recovery mode.

And once you’re done restoring/flashing that backup system, your Android tablet/smartphone will work normally again as it used to be.

So it’s gonna be in the same exact conditions when your tablet was still working fine.

But of course, in order to be able to restore your device, you must firstly create the backup by using CWM custom recovery mode.

So this is why today, after having explained to you the importance of having custom recovery mode and also the step-by-step guide to install CWM on your Android device, right now I’m about to show you how exactly to create the backup of your Android tablet/smartphone (the ENTIRE system) with ClockWorkMod.

Okay then, without further ado, here is my step-by-step guide to create the backup system using custom recovery mode (CWM).

1. Free up some space on the storage

In order to create the backup system of your tablet/smartphone with CWM, you must firstly have the sufficient amount of space either on your internal storage or microSD card.

And this is really crucial because the ‘backup system’ file which later will be generated by CWM custom recovery mode is gonna be pretty huge, depending on the amount of data you’re currently having right now on your internal storage.

So before even going to the process of creating the backup with CWM recovery mode, firstly I need you to move all of photos, videos, mp3 and other media files from internal storage to microSD card.

By doing this, not only will it give a huge space for the ‘backup file’ from CWM recovery mode, but it will also keep the ‘backup file’ SMALL in size.

And this is really important because we just want to backup the important things on the device, like bookmarks, contacts, some important apps, homescreen layout and logged in accounts (usernames and passwords).

2. Uninstall some heavy games and apps

Okay, if you have already installed so many games and apps on internal storage of your tablet/smartphone, and your games happen to be so heavy in size, then the backup file generated by CWM is gonna be extremely huge.

And this is because all of the installed games and apps on your device will be automatically included inside the backup file.

This is why I strongly recommend you to keep the size of 'the backup file' SMALL in size so later the process of backing up can go smoothly without a problem because your tablet already has sufficient amount of space on the storage/microSD.

But you probably wonder why would you want to remove most of your heavy games that you’re currently still playing, right?

And besides, it can be really overwhelming to download them all over again on Google Play Store and then play these games from the beginning.

Well, you don’t need to worry anything about that because there are 2 apps that can help you solve this problem. And they are Titanium Backup (requires root access) and X-plore.

So Titanium Backup, as its name implies, is indeed an app that can create the backup for each of your apps and games that you currently have on your device right now.

Meanwhile, X-plore is actually just a normal file manager or file explorer that does exactly what other file managers do, like copying/cutting/pasting files or documents, etc.

3. Go to the CWM Recovery Mode

So after freeing up some space on your internal storage/microSD card and also removing/uninstalling some of heavy apps and games from your device, the next thing you need to do is finally go to the new custom recovery mode of ClockWorkMod (which you’ve already installed before).

Entering to the custom recovery mode is actually pretty simple. You can either do it manually or automatically using an app “Rashr” (which you’ve already installed before in my previous article).

So within this app, there will be some options of actions presented to you right when you open the app.

How to Backup the System of Android Tablet/Smartphone Using CWM (ClockWorkMod)

Now press“Reboot to Recovery” button to reboot your device into the custom recovery mode (CWM).

Alternatively, you can also go to the recovery mode manually by turning OFF your tablet/smartphone, and then turning it ON again by pressing VOLUME UP BUTTON + POWER BUTTON at the same time.

Remember, at the same time!

But I think this is kind of tricky because sometimes you don’t press the buttons properly as it will boot up to the normal system, not to the recovery mode.

So this is why I recommend you to rebooting to the recovery mode by using Rashr as this app provides you the simple way to do that.

4. Select “backup and restore”

Okay, now you’re finally entering to the ClockWorkMod recovery mode. In this CWM, there will be some options presented to you here, like:
  • reboot system now,
  • install zip from sdcard,
  • wipe data/factory reset
  • wipe cache and partition
  • backup and restore
  • and other more.
You can easily control your choice by using the VOLUME UP and VOLUME DOWN BUTTONS. And if you want to select your choice, press the POWER BUTTON.

How to Backup the System of Android Tablet/Smartphone Using CWM (ClockWorkMod)

Now select “backup and restore” in the options to enter to the backup and restore mode.

5. Select“restore and backup”

Now in the ‘backup and restore’ mode, some new options of actions will be prompted to you again in the screen, like:
  • backup to sdcard0
  • backup to sdcard1
  • and other more
Okay, the code/number ‘0’ in ‘backup to sdcard0’ indicates that the CWM backup later will be saved in internal storage (0).

On the other hand, the number ‘1’ in ‘backup to sdcard1’ indicates that the backup will be kept in external storage (1), or in this case, microSD card on your device.

I STRONGLY recommend you to create the CWM backup in the internal storage because the process of creating backup will run much smoother this way than in EXTERNAL STORAGE/microSD card.

And this is because the device can just focus on creating the backup in internal storage without being overwhelmed with other tasks like reading and writing to the microSD card.

I actually have tried it myself many times to create the backup in external storage (microSD card) and most of the times, it’s usually stuck in the middle of the process because the device was kind of ‘chocked’ when trying to read and write to the microSD card.

It's probably because my microSD card has already come to its retirement. So I need to replace it with a new better microSD card that has much faster reading and writing speed.

This is why I already asked you earlier to free up some space on internal storage, including removing some heavy games and apps from your device, in order to give a huge sufficient space for the ‘backup file’ that later will be generated by CWM custom recovery mode.

6. Choose “backup to sdcard0”

Okay, in the ‘backup and restore’ window, now select the option ‘backup to sdcard0’ to let ClockWorkMod create the backup file in internal storage.

In the next prompted window, select again the “Yes” option to ensure that CWM has your permission to create the backup system of your tablet/smartphone in internal storage.

Bear in mind that this process is gonna take a while, probably around 15 minutes. So while waiting for the process to finish, you can just leave your tablet/smartphone alone on the desk without any interruption.

So don’t interrupt this process! And this means, DON’T PRESS ANY BUTTON because your device is doing something pretty heavy right now, which is creating the backup of entire Android system of your tablet/smartphone.

You can actually know directly from the screen about what you're device is currently doing right now because during the process of creating the backup, there will be some messages prompted on the screen.

7. The backup system has been successfully created!

When you finally see the prompted text that indicates the process is complete, then it means, the backup system of your device has been successfully created by ClockWorkMod recovery mode.

Congratulations, now you have finally made the ‘backup system’ of your Android device.

Isn’t that simple, huh? Yet very powerful and even could save your device from disaster that might happen in the future.

8. Reboot to the system now!

Okay, the next thing you need to do is now reboot to the Android system so you can go back again to the homescreen where you can use your tablet/smartphone normally just like before.

How to Backup the System of Android Tablet/Smartphone Using CWM (ClockWorkMod)


Now go back to the previous window by using the VOLUME UP/VOLUME DOWN BUTTON to control/move the option and finally select the option ‘back’ with POWER BUTTON. In the previous window, select the option 'reboot to system now'.

9. Move the backup file to PC or USB flashdisk

So after having successfully created the ‘backup system’ of your Android device using CWM, now you may want to move the ‘backup file’ either to PC or USB flashdisk.

This is really important to do because after the process of creating the backup is finished, the ‘backup file’ generated by CWM usually takes a lot of space in internal storage, probably around 3GB to 4GB (depending on the installed apps/games plus data inside the backup).

I’ve actually already done this before on my phablet in order to free up some space again in internal storage (after the backup is created).

So it’s not very hard to do. You just need to open file manager/file explorer that you currently have on your device.

And then find the folder right in the root directory called “CWM”. Okay, after finding that folder in internal storage, now cut that folder (remember, the entire ‘CWM’ folder) and paste it either to your PC or USB flashdisk.

It’s gonna take a few minutes because the size of the backup folder is pretty huge though, probably around 2GB to 4GB.

So you might want to leave your device there on the desk for a few minutes until the process of moving is done.

Conclusion

Isn’t that simple, huh?

Yes, creating the backup system of your Android device with CWM is actually quite simple. In fact, ClockWorkMod will do all the jobs for you. You just need to relax, take a coffee and wait until the process is finished.

In my opinion, I think CWM is a really powerful tool especially for many Android users out there that love to experiment with the looks/UIs of their devices.

For example, if they think that the UIs of their tablets/smartphones are really heavy and slow down the performance, or maybe the battery lives of their devices won’t last that long, they can just change the pre-installed ROMs of their devices with much simpler and more efficient ROMs like stock Android UI or maybe CyanogenMod UI.

Well, that’s all for now.

Anyway, if what I’ve written in this article is really helpful or informative for you, please don’t hesitate to share this article to your friends on Twitter or Facebook.

I would totally appreciate it.

How to install ClockWorkMod (CWM) custom recovery mode on your Android device?

Android logoPreviously, I’ve already shared to you some information about ClockWorkMod (CWM) and other stuff related to this custom recovery mode.

From the meaning of CWM, the differences between the STANDARD recovery mode and CUSTOM recovery mode (CWM), finally, to the benefits of using CWM on your Android device – all have been discussed in my previous article.

Right now, as I promised to you in my previous post, I’m about to give you my step-by-step guide how to back up the Android system of your tablet by using CWM custom recovery mode.

But of course, in order for your device to have the ability to ‘backup’ your Android system, you must firstly have the CWM custom recovery mode installed on your Android tablet.

And for your information, installing CWM can be pretty complicated as this process also requires you to root your Android device in the first place.

So before learning about how to create the backup of Android system with ClockWorkMod, today I'm gonna share to you first about how to install the CWM custom recovery mode to replace the STANDARD recovery mode of your device.

Okay then, without further ado, here you go, my very first guide, or tutorial if you would, about installing CWM custom recovery mode on your Android tablet/smartphone.

BUT REMEMBER! DO THIS AT YOUR OWN RISK! SO I'M NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ANYTHING WRONG THAT WILL HAPPEN ON YOUR ANDROID DEVICE.

1. Root your Android Device

Well, as mentioned above, in order to be able to replace the STANDARD recovery mode with the CUSTOM recovery mode like CWM, your device MUST BE ROOTED FIRST.

But if you still don’t know how to root your device and the consequence of rooting your device, then you can go check out my other new post about “how to root your Android device?”, which I’m about to publish in the next few days.

So be sure to stick around!

2. Search the right IMAGE FILE of CWM that is compatible

Okay, after rooting your tablet and it’s already been validated with an app called “Root Checker”, now you can proceed to the next step of installing the new CWM custom recovery mode in order to replace the STANDARD recovery mode of your tablet.

However, before proceeding to the next step, first you need to find the specific ClockWorkMod file for your device around the web. And that’s because every Android device available on the market has their own CWM recovery image file.

So if you install some random CWM file that is NOT compatible with your tablet/smartphone, chances are, there will be some errors happening when you enter to the recovery mode, like dark screen where you cannot do anything here.

I strongly recommend you to go check out XDAdevelopers.com forum and search for the keyphraseCWM YOUR-DEVICE-NAME-HERE” in order to find the right CWM file that is compatible with your tablet.

For example, “CWM Google Nexus 10” or “CWM Nvidia Shield Tablet”.

Alternatively, you can also download an app called “ROM manager” on Google Play Store as this app also provides some custom recovery modes (like CWM, TWRP, etc) that you can easily install on your device.

But remember, this is the PLAN B! So you must focus on finding the right CWM image file that is compatible specifically with your device around internet.

3. Put the CWM file on microSD card

So after getting the exact CWM file that is compatible with your device, now you need to put the image file of CWM (CWM.img) in your microSD card.

But remember, you should put the file right in the root directory of your microSD card, NOT INSIDE ANY FOLDER. By doing this, it will make it easier for you later to find that file for the next step.

4. Download “Rashr” on Google Play Store

Okay, next you need to find an app on Google Play Store called “Rashr” and then install the app on your device. But this app requires a rooted device in order to work. So if your tablet/smartphone hasn’t been rooted yet, this app CANNOT work.

5. Rename the CWM file into “recovery.img”

Okay, back to the CWM image file that you just downloaded and put inside the micro SD card (in the step number 3), the next thing you need to do is rename the CWM image file into recovery.img.

The image file of ClockWorkMod usually has a standard name “CWM_Philz.img”. So you just need to rename this file into recovery.img. Simple, isn’t it?

6. Open Rashr app

Now open the Rashr app that you just downloaded from Google Play Store and let the app take you to the first interface which shows you some options that you can apply on your device.

How to install ClockWorkMod (CWM) custom recovery mode on your Android device?

But be very careful to not press some random actions here because it will have a huge impact to your device.

7. Find the CWM file using Rashr

Okay, inside the app, you will be presented directly with a bunch of options. Press the first option “Recovery from Storage”. After pressing this option, a new window is opened showing you the list of folders on your storage.

How to install ClockWorkMod (CWM) custom recovery mode on your Android device?

Now scroll down to the bottom and find the file called “recovery.img”.

How to install ClockWorkMod (CWM) custom recovery mode on your Android device?

** However, if you cannot find that file, then it means this Rashr app probably cannot detect the “recovery.img” file on the default storage. **

So you need to move that “recovery.img” file from microSD card to internal storage (or the other way around, from internal storage to microSD card).

Okay, now open your file manager (file explorer) on your device and then move the “recovery.img” file from microSD card to internal storage using “Cut” function.

Now open again the Rashr app and press the option “Recovery from Storage”. I believe now you can find the file through this app.

8. Flash the "recovery.img" file

After finding the “recovery.img” file, now flash that file by pressing it.

How to install ClockWorkMod (CWM) custom recovery mode on your Android device?

There will be a warning prompted “Choosing recovery.img? Are you sure?”. Don't worry, now press the “Yes” button.

9. Reboot to the CWM custom recovery mode

Okay, after having succeeded flashing the new CWM on your device, now you can reboot to the recovery mode.

You can actually do it right away from the Rashr app or you can do it manually by turning off the phone, and then turning it on again by pressing VOLUME UP BUTTON + POWER BUTTON at the same time.

I personally prefer to reboot to the recovery mode directly from Rashr by pressing the option “Reboot Recovery”. This is actually much simpler than doing it manually with VOLUME UP BUTTON + POWER BUTTON.

How to install ClockWorkMod (CWM) custom recovery mode on your Android device?

10. ClockWorkMod has been successfully installed

Okay, congratulations, now you have already installed CWM and replaced the standard recovery mode of your Android device with the new CWM custom recovery mode.

Now you can do a lot of things with this new ClockWorkMod custom recovery mode that you CANNOT do earlier in the STANDARD recovery mode which comes pre-installed with your Android device.

With this ClockWorkMod custom recovery mode, now:
  • You can backup the Android system of your tablet/smartphone
  • You can restore your Android system if your device cannot boot up normally to the system (bootloop)
  • You can flash some new apps to enhance your device like Dolby Audio, Lenovo camera app, etc.
  • You can also flash the new SuperSU app to replace the Kingroot app that you installed earlier to root your tablet.
Anyway, in the next tutorial articles, I’m gonna show you how exactly to create a backup of your Android system by using ClockWorkMod custom recovery mode and restore it again if something bad happens on your tablet.

How ClockWorkMod (CWM) Can Backup Your Android Device and Secure All of Your Data

Android logoFor the past couple of years, I’ve been making a lot of quick reviews of many tablets on this website, from the first-gen Google Nexus 7, HP Slate7 Extreme, all the way to the latest-gen devices like Nvidia Shield Tablet, Google Nexus 9 or Sony Xperia Tablet Z2.

I’ve even already made many comparison reviews of those devices for the past couple of months. However, starting from today and in the next few months, I want to do something different here on this website.

So from now on, I’m gonna share to you some useful tips and tricks that I usually use on my Android device.

Not only that, besides sharing those tips and tricks for the next few months, I will also write some latest news concerning everything that is happening around the tablet market:
  • like the rumors about the new tablets, 
  • previews of new tablets
  • and other random news related to Android gaming and tablets.
I do this because I don’t want to keep spamming you guys with so many reviews about tablets because that can be quite boring over the time, right?

So hopefully, my new future posts will be more varied in the future and will attract you to explore more from this website.

I actually have prepared some new reviews of other new-gen tablets that I’m really excited to share to you in the near future, like the new iPad Pro, Microsoft Surface Pro 4 or Google Pixel C hybrid tablet and many other exciting devices.

But I’m still preparing those new materials for the next few months. So be sure to stick around on this website if you're also excited!

What is CWM (ClockWorkMod)?

How ClockWorkMod (CWM) Can Backup Your Android Device and Secure All of Your Data
ClockWorkMod opening logo
Anyway, today I’m actually in the mood to talk about something called “CWM” which stands for Clock Work Mod.

But do you know what is CWM?

You probably already heard this term so many times before, especially on some Android developers' forums like XDAdevelopers.com or other local Android-related forums in your country.

But for those of you who never heard of “CWM”, I will explain to you in really simple words that (hopefully) you can understand.

But before getting to the term 'ClockWorkMod', I need you to understand first the difference between STANDARD RECOVERY MODE and CUSTOM RECOVERY MODE (CWM).

What is the difference between the STANDARD recovery mode and CUSTOM recovery mode?

Okay, so STANDARD RECOVERY MODE is the standard/stock/untouched recovery mode that already comes pre-installed with any Android device on the market, either smartphone or tablet.

So if you just bought an Android smartphone/tablet, then out of the box, your device already comes with STANDARD RECOVERY MODE.

On the other hand, the CUSTOM RECOVERY MODE is the customized recovery mode that you can install on your Android device in order to REPLACE THAT STANDARD RECOVERY MODE, which already comes pre-installed on your tablet/smartphone.

But there are many custom recovery tools available to use on your Android device, like for example:
  • CWM (the one we’re talking right now), 
  • TWRP 
  • and some other more.
But the most popular and most used custom recovery tools nowadays are either ClockWorkMod (CWM) and TWRP (which I will share to you later in the future).

How ClockWorkMod (CWM) Can Backup Your Android Device and Secure All of Your Data

So CWM, which stands for Clock Work Mod, is a custom recovery mode made by some creative developers out there that has the main function to replace the STANDARD STOCK RECOVERY MODE which comes pre-installed on any Android device in the world.

However, each of these Android devices available on the market, including your Android smartphone/tablet, has their own specific version of ClockWorkMod (image/installation file).

So you CANNOT install some random ClockWorkMod version that is not compatible with your smartphone/tablet because that will cause some system errors and even damage your Android device.

How to enter to the standard recovery mode?

Okay, before I go further to explain to you more about CWM, there is one question I need to ask to you:

Have you ever tried to enter to the STANDARD RECOVERY MODE of your Android tablet/smartphone?

Well, if you haven’t already, then you probably should check it out by doing these steps below (but be very careful with the step number 5 ):
  1. Turning off your Android smartphone/tablet
  2. Press volume UP button + power button AT THE SAME TIME.
  3. After the screen is ON, release the volume UP and power buttons.
  4. There you go, now you are in the standard recovery mode of your Android device.
  5. But DON’T EVER PRESS the VOLUME DOWN BUTTON in this recovery mode because in stock recovery mode, this button is usually assigned as ‘SELECT’ or ‘TAKE ACTION’ button.
(So if you don’t know what to do in this recovery mode, I strongly recommend you to press again the POWER BUTTON for more than 10 seconds to turn off your Android device so that you can turn it on again to the normal booting up process to the homescreen).

However, each of the Android devices sold on the market, either smartphones or tablets, comes pre-installed with their own standard recovery mode from each manufacturer.

So for example, the STANDARD RECOVERY MODE of Xiaomi MiPad is totally different with the standard recovery mode of Google Nexus 9. It goes the same with the standard recovery mode of Nvidia Shield Tablet that is different with the one found on HP Slate7 Extreme.

And then, these standard stock recovery modes don’t have the capability to BACKUP the WHOLE Android system of your smartphone or tablet.

So they usually are there mostly for doing simple system tasks, like:
  • installing new firmware, 
  • installing new apps, 
  • resetting to the factory setting 
  • and other simple tasks. 
So this is the reason why CWM exists.

Why do you need custom recovery mode?

But then, you probably wonder, why do you need to replace the standard recovery mode of your Android device with CWM?

Well, the main reason is, in this CWM custom recovery mode, you are allowed to do other tasks that you CANNOT do in the standard recovery mode.

And one of them is the ability to BACKUP the Android system of your Android device.

So by creating the backup of your Android system, not only can you save ALL THE THINGS that you have already on the homescreen of your device (like: apps, games, widgets, text messages, and many more), but you can literally save EVERYTHING on internal storage of your smartphone/tablet (like settings, logged in accounts, web browsers bookmarks, etc).

So if something horrible happens on your Android device, like for example, your tablet won’t boot up normally to the system or it keeps rebooting after the intro/logo, then you can restore the system back to normal by using the backup file that you’ve already created before using this CWM custom recovery mode.

And everything will go back to normal again as it’s used to be when your device was still working fine.

But of course, you must firstly create the backup of the Android system in order to have the BACKUP FILE which later can be used to restore your device when something bad happens in the future.

In my opinion, I think ClockWorkMod is really helpful. In fact, CWM should be a MUST HAVE feature on any Android device.

However, CWM is not for everyone.

This custom recovery mode is only created for those people who are well-experienced about rooting Android system of their devices.

So if you are NOT one of these people, I strongly recommend you to stay away from CWM and hand over the job to other users who have the experience in this area.

Is it safe to install custom recovery mode on your Android device?

The good news is, you can now learn about installing CWM custom recovery mode on your device by yourself.

But then again, installing CWM on your Android device can be considered as really complicated here because it requires you to have the experience of rooting your device in the first place.

Not to mention, the process of rooting on every Android tablet on the market is very different one to another.

So the rooting process of Google Nexus 10 is totally different with the rooting process of Nvidia Shield Tablet. It goes the same with other devices.

And you CANNOT apply some random rooting method to your own tablet/smartphone because it will cause such a huge damage to your device that will prevent it from booting up to the normal system (bootloop/softbrick).

And even worse, your tablet cannot be turned on ever again just like it used to be, (hardbrick, when your device has literally become useless just like a hard brick that does nothing).

XDAdevelopers forum to the rescue!

So this is why I strongly recommend, in fact, I insist you to go to some specific forums on the web that are dedicated to your own tablet.

For instance, you can check out XDAdevelopers.com as this website forum is the most popular forum related to Android and has extremely huge database about rooting Android smartphones/tablets, installing custom ROMs and many other more.

So you literally can find anything related to Android on this XDAdevelopers forum.

In fact, most of the rooting processes you find on the web are actually based on the step-by-step guides taken from XDAdevelopers.com.

I personally use XDAdevelopers.com a lot to find out about the methods to root my Android devices or install custom ROMs in the past.

Besides XDAdevelopers.com, I also visit other local website forums to meet many fellow users in my country and share information with them simply because it's easy to communicate with them and also, their devices (models/types) are similar with mine.

So if something wrong happens with my device, I can just ask them for a help.

Anyway, right now I’m about to share to you the tutorial or step-by-step guide to backup the Android system of your device by using CWM custom recovery mode.

However, I’m not sharing it today on this page because I’ve already made the dedicated page for that tutorial on other post.

So if you want to learn more about installing CWM custom recovery mode on your Android device, then be sure to check out my other post about "How to Install ClockWorkMod on your Android Tablet/Smartphone?".

Okay, I'll see you there!

Toshiba Excite Write vs Samsung GALAXY Note 10.1 (2014): Gaming Performance, Benchmarks and Comparison

aaaHi guys, welcome back!

Despite being sold in a niche market, the existence of note-dedicated tablets is still needed by most of tablet shoppers out there. There are many options available in this category, from really popular Samsung GALAXY Note 10.1 and Microsoft Surface Pro, to a small player like Toshiba Excite Write.

Yes, most of these tablets offer great note-taking experience for those productive users out there and even designers as well. So this is the reason why I’m excited today to talk about note tablets.

I know that many of them available on the street and some of them haven’t got the chance to be showcased on this website, like the latest-gen Microsoft Surface Pro tablets or iPad Pro.

But I will definitely bring them up on this website in the near future.

In fact, I’ve been preparing some materials for these new-gen tablets for next future reviews. So be sure to stick around on this website if you’re interested to know more.

Anyway, today in this comparison review, I’m about to show you the rivalry between 2 note tablets from Android camp, the first one is Toshiba Excite Write and its challenger is Samsung GALAXY Note 10.1.

Toshiba Excite Write vs Samsung GALAXY Note 10.1 (2014) benchmarks and gaming performance

Well, if you’re on the same page with me and wanna know about their comparisons in many aspects, as well as my take on their gaming performances, then here check this one out guys, my comparison review between Toshiba Excite Write and Samsung GALAXY Note 10.1 (2014).

Enjoy!

Introduction

To be honest, I’ve always been a big fan of HP Slate7 Extreme or Nvidia Shield Tablet because not only do these tablets have great powerful gaming performances, but they also offer something that not many other devices do.

And that is the capability to write the digital pen or stylus.

However, HP Slate7 Extreme and Nvidia Shield Tablet are not the only 2 note-taking devices that have great writing experiences from their styluses. There’s more.

And 2 of them are the ones that get compared in this review – Toshiba Excite Write and Samsung GALAXY Note 10.1 (2014).

Actually, when we talk about note-dedicated tablets, the first device that will pop up in our minds is definitely Samsung GALAXY Note because this note series from Samsung was the pioneer in note-tablet market and has been the biggest player in this tablet category for the past couple of years.

On the other hand, Toshiba Excite Write is still considered as a dust in the universe because it’s not really popular in note tablet market and not many people know about this device.

However, despite being a small player in note tablet territory, there are actually tons of great things that we can appreciate from this Toshiba’s slate.

First of all, its gaming performance.

So Toshiba Excite Write is really powerful in gaming performance. And that's thanks to its Tegra 4 processor that is rocking a 72-core GPU.

Second of all, this not-so-popular tablet is sporting a super-high-resolution display, the same resolution display that Samsung uses on Samsung GALAXY Note 10.1 (2014). So there will be a great sharpness found on the screen of Toshiba Excite Write.

But the questions remain, with all of the greatness and superiority found on each of these 2 note tablets, which one between Toshiba Excite Write and Samsung GALAXY Note 10.1 (2014) that deserves to be the best gaming tablet in this review?

Which one is the best tablet in the whole aspect, especially as a note device?

Is it worth it to buy any of these tablets for playing high-performing games?

Design

To be honest, I don’t have enough information concerning the design of Toshiba Excite Write. So I have nothing to share in this regard. But from what I’ve seen on one video review on YouTube about this tablet, Toshiba Excite Write actually looks quite generic with its design.

There’s nothing special and unique about this tablet, especially compared to other rivals like Google Nexus 10, Sony Xperia Tablet Z or iPad Air, which all of these guys have their own uniqueness and characteristics that totally make them look stand out in the competition.

This is the opposite with the 2014 edition of Samsung GALAXY Note 10.1 with its design. I think this Samsung’s tablet really excels and has the edge here in this department, especially compared to Toshiba Excite Write.

It has this unique faux leather finish on the back, fake stitching near the edge of that rear case and also, fake metallic trim around the side of this device.

Even though all of these elements are not made out of real leather and metallic materials, they actually still make Samsung GALAXY Note 10.1 look quite elegant and premium.

The design of this Samsung’s note tablet actually kind of reminds me with the same exact design of its sibling, Samsung GALAXY Note 3, which was released a few months before the bigger variant came out.

As a matter of fact, Samsung GALAXY Note 10.1 actually takes almost all the design cues of Samsung GALAXY Note 3. So they both share the same faux leather, fake stitching and fake metallic trim around the side.

And just like Note 3, the 2014 edition of Samsung GALAXY Note 10.1 of course also has that dedicated port for the S-Pen on the back.

Back to Top

Toshiba Excite WriteSamsung GALAXY NOTE 10.1 (2014)
No SIM
Released 2013, July
671.3 g (Weight)
Stylus
10.1 inch LED-backlit IPS LCD capacitive touchscreen, 16M colors
2560 x 1600 pixels,(~299 ppi pixel density)
Quad-core Cortex-A15 Nvidia Tegra 4 Chipset
ULP GeForce GPU
2 GB RAM
Android OS 4.2.1 Jelly Bean
8 MP rear-facing camera (autofocus and LED flash) 3264 x 2448 pixels
1.2 MP front-facing camera
microSD Card slot for up to 32 GB
32 GB Internal storage
Wi-Fi 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac, dual-band
Bluetooth
microUSB v2.0
Accelerometer, gyro, compass Sensors
HTML5 Browser
GPS
No Radio
HDMI port
Java MIDP emulator
Silver Colors
Non-removable 33 Wh Li-Po battery
Up to 11 hours for Talk time (multimedia)
Released October 2013,
S Pen stylus
10.1 inch Super clear LCD capacitive touchscreen, 2560 x 1600 pixels, (~299 ppi pixel density)
Qualcomm Snapdragon 800 Quad-core 2.3 GHz Krait 400 CPU (LTE model)
Adreno 330 (LTE model) GPU
3 GB RAM
Android OS, v4.3 (Jelly Bean) Samsung TouchWiz UI
microSD Card slot for up to 64 GB
16/32/64 GB Internal storage
8 MP rear-facing camera, LED flash
2 MP front-facing camera
Micro-SIM
GPRS
EDGE
Wi-Fi 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac, dual-band
Radio TBD
Java
Bluetooth
Infrared port
GPS
USB
Non-removable Li-Po 8220 mAh battery
Up to 2230 hours Stand-by
Up to 49 hours (3G) Talk time
Up to 98 hours Music play

Both Toshiba Excite Write and Samsung GALAXY Note 10.1 are no doubt two high-end flagship devices from Toshiba and Samsung. So they are powerful and superior when it comes to spec sheet as well as performance.

So Toshiba Excite Write features a Tegra 4 quad-core processor, which we know is one powerful chipset with a staggering 72-core GPU.

And then, it has 2GB of RAM, an 8MP rear-facing camera with LED flash, 1.2MP front shooter, external storage for up to 32GB, a 33Wh battery and of course, an insanely sharp 10.1-inch screen sporting the 2560x1600 pixels resolution.

The same happens to the 2014 edition of Samsung GALAXY Note 10.1.

So it comes with a powerful Snapdragon 800 processor and Adreno 320 GPU, plus 3GB of RAM in the sector of performance.

And then, an 8MP rear camera with LED flash and a 2MP front shooter are responsible here in photography.

It’s powered by a huge 8220mAh battery and supported with external storage for up to 64GB via microSD card.

By looking at some crucial parts of their specs, we can see right through here that both Toshiba Excite Write and Samsung GALAXY Note 10.1 are definitely high-end flagship tablets.

I mean, they have superior performances, their cameras are top notch, their batteries are huge and they have super high-resolution screens.

Stylus vs Stylus

Samsung GALAXY Note series has always been one of the best note-dedicated tablet series on the market for the past couple of years. In fact, it is still the best in the world (of course before iPad Pro came around).

It’s no exception with the 2014 edition of Samsung GALAXY Note 10.1.

I probably will not talk a lot about the S-Pen stylus of Samsung GALAXY Note 10.1 because we know already how great and amazing it is.

But in simple words, not only can you take some simple notes or write some novels with the S-Pen on Samsung GALAXY Note 10.1, but you can also create some beautiful paintings out of this digital pen.

This is why Samsung GALAXY Note series has been the top choice for most of designers and artists out there for the past couple of years. They know how great it is to accommodate their passions of designing and painting more professionally.

All thanks to N-trig that develops the technology behind this S-Pen (as well as on HP Slate7 Extreme and Microsoft Surface Pro), which is basically to make sure that its writing experience is close to the experience of writing on a real paper.

So on Samsung GALAXY Note 10.1, you can easily control the thickness of the S-Pen on the fly by applying more pressure of the S-Pen to the screen.

I mean, if we put pressure to the S-Pen little bit harder on the screen, the results will be thicker.

On the other hand, if the pen is applied softly on the screen, the results will be really thin, which is awesome because with this capability, you no longer need to choose a bunch of thickness options through the setting.

However, this is totally the opposite with the stylus of Toshiba Excite Write.

So unlike the S-Pen that is so awesome with its realistic writing experience, the stylus of this Toshiba’s tablet is the other way around.

So everytime you want to draw a bold line on the screen with the stylus, you must firstly choose which type of thickness from the available options that you really want to apply on the screen.

It goes the same when you want to draw a thin line. And this ruins the whole drawing/writing experience on this device.

Screen, UI and Battery Life

As far as screen sharpness is concerned, there’s actually no significant difference of sharpness found on the screens of both tablets.

They have the same exact 10.1-inch displays sporting the same exact 2560x1600 pixels resolution. And overall, the screens on these 2 tablets look insanely sharp and gorgeous.

Samsung GALAXY Note 10.1 with its Super Clear LCD is definitely a top notch quality display with the usual over-saturated colors. So everything on the screen looks really crisp and vivid with popping out colors.

But surprisingly, the same thing also happens to the screen of Toshiba Excite Write.

So based on some video reviews on YouTube about this tablet, the screen of Toshiba Excite Write not only has the sharpness, but also looks quite gorgeous with well-saturated colors and great viewing angle.

On software side, they both are running on the same Android platform, with Samsung GALAXY Note 10.1 getting Android 4.3 Jelly Bean out of the box, while Toshiba Excite Write comes with slightly older Android 4.2.1 Jelly Bean version.

However, these 2 tablets come pre-installed with entirely different UIs here. So Samsung GALAXY Note 10.1, as usual, comes with Samsung’s own heavily-customized TouchWiz UI.

Meanwhile, on Toshiba’s tablet, the UI looks little bit like the stock version of Android, although there are still some customizations found here and there like on the icons, wallpaper and stuff.

But it’s not as heavily-customized as the TouchWiz UI of Samsung GALAXY Note 10.1.

This is a good thing because it will allow this Toshiba’s tablet to perform really fast and smooth, without squeezing a lot of power from its already-huge battery, especially when we already know that Tegra 4 processor is one power hungry processor.

And that’s proved by how Toshiba Excite Write is so great when it comes to battery life. It lasted almost 8 hours and 12 minutes in moderate use, according to battery benchmark test.

However, Samsung GALAXY Note 10.1 impressively managed to top that achievement by reaching over 24 hours and 20 minutes for browsing with WiFi in minimum brightness.

But of course, the battery lives of both Toshiba Excite Write and Samsung GALAXY Note 10.1 are not gonna last that long (probably around 6 hours) if you use any of these devices to do some heavy intense tasks without resting the screen at all, like for watching movies in marathon or playing games in the row.

Cameras

If there is one strongest point found on Samsung GALAXY Note 10.1, then it’s definitely its cameras.

So if you’re a huge fan of photography and you love taking photos or recording videos, then you can totally count on the cameras of this note tablet to accommodate your hobby.

I’m actually not gonna talk a lot about this because I already know that many flagship devices from Samsung, either smartphones or tablets, mostly have great quality cameras.

As for the cameras of Toshiba Excite Write, unfortunately, I haven’t seen any photos or videos taken with its cameras. So to be perfectly honest, I have nothing to share here in this regard.

But by looking at the camera specs of this tablet, 8MP on the back and another 1.2MP on the front, plus LED flash, then all I can say is, these cameras probably are not that bad in terms of sharpness and quality, if not as great as the cameras of Samsung GALAXY Note 10.1.

But you can still count on them to take photos/videos.

Back to Top

Toshiba Excite Write looks so superior with a Tegra 4 quad-core processor, coupled with 72-core ULP GeForce GPU and 2GB of RAM. So on paper, of course this tablet really screams a lot in performance, especially for gaming.

But Samsung GALAXY Note 10.1 is also an impressive performer here, thanks to Snapdragon 800 quad-core processor, a huge 3GB of RAM and Adreno 330 GPU. So this note-dedicated tablet is also a beast when it comes to gaming performance.

However, the 2014 edition of Samsung GALAXY Note 10.1 actually has 2 different versions - the LTE and WiFi/3G models.

So the LTE model comes with hardware package that consists: Snapdragon 800 processor, Adreno 330 GPU and 3GB of RAM.

Meanwhile, the 3G/WiFI variant got the other package: Samsung Exynos 5 Octa 5420 octa-core chipset, 3GB of RAM and Mali-T628 MP6.

These 2 packages actually are incredibly powerful in performance. However, from what I’ve seen from a video review from theVerge, the 3G/WiFi model of Samsung GALAXY Note 10.1 apparently is not that powerful.

So there are still some choppiness and stutters especially when deploying some heavy tasks like opening Samsung News Hub and also when playing heavy games like GTA San Andreas.

The super-sharp display of this tablet could be the culprit of that problem because the processor inside this tablet (Samsung Exynos 5420) is probably not sufficient enough to run this type of screen in such a heavy UI.

And we know how heavy the TouchWiz of Samsung GALAXY devices, especially the NOTE series, filled with many bloatwares and features, especially for the S-Pen.

So if you’re on the verge of buying Samsung GALAXY Note 10.1, I strongly recommend you to pick up the LTE model as this variant is more powerful in performance than the 3G and WiFi-only models.

But even so, the 3G/WiFi version of Samsung GALAXY Note 10.1 is still a great performer, but it’s just not on the same level with the LTE model.

Anyway, according to some benchmark tests held by some tech sites on the net, both Toshiba Excite and Samsung GALAXY Note 10.1 managed to grab some decent scores.

Toshiba Excite Write with its Tegra 4 processor reached 12.272 points in Quadrant v2, 26.696 points in Antutu and 851.03 points in Sunspider 0.9.1.

On the flip side, Samsung GALAXY Note 10.1 also looked impressive in Antutu benchmark test with 32.408 points. Meanwhile, in GFXBench T-Rex HD (on screen), this note tablet managed to run the app in 13.8 fps (frame rate per second).

As far as the gaming performance goes, basically you can play any kind of games on any of these devices.

Even the latest and most graphically demanding games like Asphalt 8: Airborne, Modern Combat 4, GTA Vice City, NOVA 3, Need for Speed Most Wanted or even GTA San Andreas, all can be played perfectly in buttery smooth performance, either on Toshiba Excite Write or Samsung GALAXY Note 10.1.

And their battery lives are also great and long lasting, even for doing heavy stuff like gaming. So you can play games on these 2 devices for very solid long hours.

Not to mention, the support of expandable storage via microSD card slot will also provide more storage space to keep as many games as you want on any of these tablets.

So between the 2, I’ve gotta to say that they both are great gaming tablets. In fact, they are still 2 of the best gaming tablets on the market right now.

Anyway guys, if you want to know more about their gaming performances, including what games that will run on these tablets, check out my YouTube video playlist or Pinterest page. :)

My Personal Opinions

So we’ve finally come to the final conclusion of this comparison review. But which is the best gaming tablet in this review?

Well, both tablets are actually incredibly powerful in performance, especially for gaming.

And you cannot do wrong if you pick any of these 2 tablets as the choice of your gaming device because they both are more than happier to execute any of your favorite games. No doubt about that.

So is it worth it to buy any of these tablets especially for gaming? The answer is of course YES. Either Toshiba Excite Write or Samsung GALAXY Note 10.1 is an incredible gaming tablet.

However, as a note-dedicated device, I think it’s really obvious here that Samsung GALAXY Note 10.1 is the one that deserves to claim the throne as the best note tablet, thanks to its amazing S-Pen stylus.

Meanwhile, the stylus of Toshiba Excite Write, as well as its writing experience is definitely not so great especially compared to the S-Pen of Samsung GALAXY Note 10.1.

The good thing is, Toshiba Excite Write is still on the same page here with Samsung GALAXY Note 10.1 when it comes to hardware specs.

It has a super-sharp display with 2560x1600 pixels resolution, 2GB of RAM, a powerful Tegra 4 processor, 72-core GPU, an 8MP rear camera with LED flash, a huge 33Wh battery and the support of expandable storage for up to 32GB.

So I think its expensive price is still acceptable here because it comes with flagship quality specs.

But then again, if the tablet you’re looking for is a tablet that has great writing experience, then Samsung GALAXY Note 10.1 is definitely your best choice here.

On the other hand, if you’re only looking for a reliable gaming tablet that has great specs and it also happens to offer note experience with its stylus, then Toshiba Excite Write can also be a decent option for you.

Both tablets are great.

But Samsung GALAXY Note 10.1 is of course the one with the best note experience. In fact, it is the best on the market right now, alongside Apple iPad Pro, Nvidia Shield Tablet, Microsoft Surface Pro or HP Slate7 Extreme.

Pros and Cons

Toshiba Excite Write

Pros:
  • it’s really expensive
  • a super-sharp and gorgeous 2.5K display
  • insanely powerful gaming performance
  • great set of cameras, including LED flash
  • a huge 33Wh battery (mAh)
  • the support of digital pen
  • huge 2GB of RAM
  • microSD card support for up to 32GB
Cons:
  • the note experience on this device is not that good
  • Tegra 4 processor is plagued with overheating issue
  • generic looking design

Samsung GALAXY Note 10.1 (2014)

Pros:
  • powerful Snapdragon 800 processor
  • great for playing games
  • amazing stylus experience with S-Pen
  • great quality cameras with LED flash
  • solid battery life
  • the support of expandable storage for up to 64GB
  • premium looking design with faux leather finish
Cons:
  • the performance of regular 3G/WiFi model is not as fast as the LTE variant
  • TouchWiz software is bulky, filled with gimmicky features
  • there’s still no upgrade/sequel of this tablet

Disclaimer: Hi guys, bear in mind that this is not some in-depth review. This is Read more...

Nvidia Shield Tablet vs HP Slate8 Pro: Comparison, Gaming Performance and Benchmarks

aaaHi guys, welcome back!

I think it’s weird that I’ve never done the comparison between Nvidia Shield Tablet and HP Slate8 Pro in my previous reviews especially seeing how they both have some in common here and there in hardware department.

First of all, they both are running on Tegra processors, although Nvidia Shield Tablet gets the better treatment here with the latest and greatest Tegra K1 processor. And then, they also are packing 8-inch displays with slightly similar resolutions.

So with all of these similarities found on both devices, I think today is the best time for me to finally bring them up in my next comparison review.

Nvidia Shield Tablet vs HP Slate8 Pro benchmarks and gaming performance

I think this would be quite interesting to find out and explore more about the whole thing of both devices, especially with their gaming capabilities.

Well, if you’re on the same page with me and you wanna know more about how the comparison goes between these 2 tablets, as well as my take on their gaming performances, then check this one out, my comparison review between Nvidia Shield Tablet and HP Slate8 Pro.

Hope you enjoy reading it!

Introduction

I think it’s really amazing to see how aggressive Nvidia has really been for the past couple of years, especially in introducing console-quality gaming through its Tegra lineup.

From the early Tegra 2 dual-core that were found powering some older-gen tablets like Acer Iconia Tab A500, Motorola Xoom or Sony Tablet P, all the way to the present with the latest and greatest Tegra K1 processor embedded inside new-gen devices like Nvidia Shield Tablet or Xiaomi Mi Pad.

And all of these Tegra-powered tablets are no doubt really great in performance, especially for gaming. In fact, almost all of them have been some of the best gaming tablets on the market in their eras.

HP Slate8 Pro is no exception. Thanks to its Tegra 4 quad-core processor and its staggering 72-core GeForce ULP GPU, you can literally throw any games on this device and it will just execute them in buttery smooth performance without any lag.

The same applies to Nvidia Shield Tablet with its Tegra K1 processor that will be more than happier to accommodate any hardcore gamer out there to play their favorite games on Android platform.

But the questions are, with all of the great powerful gaming performance found on both tablets, which one between Nvidia Shield Tablet and HP Slate8 Pro that deserves to be the best gaming tablet in this comparison review?

Which one is the best in the whole aspect?

Is it worth it to buy any of these devices especially to play heavy games?

Design

I probably will not talk about the designs of Nvidia Shield Tablet here because I’ve already done that a lot in many of my previous reviews. So if you want to learn more about that, go check out my older reviews of Nvidia Shield Tablet on this website.

So basically this tablet still inherits almost every design element found on the predecessor, Nvidia Tegra Note.

So there are dual-front-speaker grilles on the left and right bezels (in landscape mode) and the front-side also has dual-color layer (black and grey), which makes this tablet look stylish and sophisticated.

Meanwhile, the design of HP Slate8 Pro actually looks similar just like the iPad mini because it also uses 4:3 aspect ratio on its 8-inch display, the same aspect ratio used on the 7.9-inch display of Apple’s mini tablet.

So this tablet seems to be wider horizontally, as opposed to the 16:9 aspect ratio of Nvidia Shield Tablet that makes this tablet look thinner in portrait mode.

So the experience of watching movies, reading books, browsing the web or playing games definitely feel better and satisfying on HP Slate8 Pro because this tablet provides much bigger screen real estate than on Nvidia Shield Tablet.

But the consequence is, it’s probably not ideal to use HP Slate8 Pro single-handedly because it's pretty huge to hold with one hand.

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Nvidia Shield TabletHP Slate8 Pro
No SIM
Released 2014, July
390 g (Weight)
DirectStylus 2
8.0 inchCapacitive touchscreen, 1920 x 1200 pixels, 16M colors (~283 ppi pixel density)
Dual bass reflex port audio enhancement
Android OS 4.4.2 KitKat
Quad-core 2.2 GHz Cortex-A15 Nvidia Tegra K1 Chipset
ULP GeForce Kepler 192-core GPU
microSD Memory Card slot for up to 128GB
Internal 16 GB
2 GB RAM
No GPRS
No EDGE
Wi-Fi 802.11
Bluetooth
microUSB
5 MP rear-facing camera (2592 ? 1944 pixels) autofocus touch focus, HDR
5 MP front-facing camera with HDR
HTML5 Browser
No Radio
GPS
Java MIDP emulator
HDMI port
19.75 Wh Li-Ion battery
Released December 2013
8.0 inch Capacitive touchscreen, 1200 x 1600 pixels, (~250 ppi pixel density)
Android OS, v4.2.2 (Jelly Bean)
Nvidia Tegra 4 T40 S Quad-core 1.8 GHz Cortex-A15 CPU
8 MP Camera, autofocus, LED flash
microSD card slot for up to 32 GB
16 GB Internal storage
1 GB RAM
Bluetooth
USB
No SIM
No EDGE
No Data
GPRS
Wi-Fi 802.11 a/b/g/n, dual-band
No Radio
GPS
Java
Beats Audio sound enhancement
Non-removable Li-Po 5680 mAh battery
Up to 11 hours 30 min (multimedia) Talk time

As far as the specs goes, Nvidia Shield Tablet looks shinier here than HP Slate8 Pro.

So first of all, its 8-inch screen is sporting higher 1920x1200 pixels resolution (full HD resolution), as opposed to the 8-inch display of HP Slate8 Pro that comes with slightly lower 1600x1200 pixels.

And then, there are 2GB of RAM, a more powerful Tegra K1 processor coupled with 192-core GeForce ULP GPU, 5MP cameras front and back without LED flash, Android 4.4.2 KitKat comes out of the box which is upgradable to Lollipop, microSD card support for up to 128 GB and the 19.75Wh battery powering this tablet.

Meanwhile, as an older-gen tablet, HP Slate8 Pro comes second in specs. It’s powered by a Tegra 4 quad-core processor with 72-core GeForce ULP GPU, its RAM is 1GB, the cameras are 8MP on the back and another one on the front (720p), there’s also Beats Audio sound enhancement, while 5680mAh battery is running the engine.

Screen, UI and Battery Life

In terms of sharpness, of course Nvidia Shield Tablet has the edge here against HP Slate8 Pro. And that’s clearly because its 8-inch screen is sporting much higher resolution (1920x1200 pixels) than the 8-inch display of HP Slate8 Pro (1600x1200 pixels).

So browsing the web or reading books on Nvidia Shield Tablet definitely gets the most benefit here because the text will look sharp and crisp even in overview (without zooming in).

But even so, the screen sharpness of HP Slate8 Pro is still exquisite because the amount of pixels on its screen is not significantly different with the display on Nvidia Shield Tablet.

Interestingly, the 8-inch screen of HP Slate8 Pro uses unorthodox 4:3 aspect ratio, which is the same aspect ratio found on the 7.9-inch display of iPad mini.

As a result, this makes this tablet look wider horizontally, thus giving a much bigger screen real estate in portrait mode.

So reading books, browsing the web, watching movies or playing games is definitely more pleasing to do on HP Slate8 Pro than on Nvidia Shield Tablet.

On software side, both Nvidia Shield Tablet and HP Slate8 Pro are running on stock Android OS. So if you’re already familiar with pure stock UI of Android with less customizations, then you can totally find it here on both devices.

The homescreen layout is standard, there are app drawer, widget element, Google Now, drop-down notification/setting window and many more.

And as an older-gen device, of course HP Slate8 Pro comes pre-installed an older Android 4.2.2 Jelly Bean software here, while Nvidia Shield Tablet looks more updated with its Android 4.4.2 KitKat, which is upgradeable to Lollipop.

The good thing of using stock Android UI is, not only do these 2 tablets run much faster and smoother in performance, but they are also more efficient with the use of memory/RAM and especially power, providing much better longevity of battery lives on both tablets.

However, according to some benchmark test held by tech sites on the web, Nvidia Shield Tablet surprisingly is not very good when it comes to battery life.

So it could only last around 5 hours and 46 minutes for browsing with WiFi. Meanwhile, HP Slate8 Pro looks better here in battery life by reaching over 11 hours and 30 minutes for doing video playback, which is really impressive.

Luckily, Nvidia Shield Tablet is upgradeable to Android 5.1 Lollipop. And this newer version of OS brings major improvements especially in battery life. So hopefully, by upgrading to Lollipop, the battery life of this Nvidia's tablet could be improved much further.

Cameras

If you’re really into photography, then you’ll be glad to hear that the cameras, especially the rear one, on each Nvidia Shield Tablet and HP Slate8 Pro is more than capable to take decent quality photos or videos.

Nvidia Shield Tablet is equipped with 5MP cameras front and back, while HP Slate8 Pro looks more promising here with its 8MP camera on the back, accompanied with another 720p front-facing shooter.

I know that mega pixel count doesn’t have anything to do with picture quality, but I believe the photos taken by the rear camera of HP Slate8 Pro will provide more details than on Nvidia’s slate.

Even so, you can still count on the rear-facing camera of Nvidia Shield Tablet because the predecessor (Nvidia Tegra Note) actually has a great quality rear camera (based on many video reviews).

So I assume that Nvidia will also use the same or even better camera sensor on Nvidia Shield Tablet, especially given that this tablet is a flagship device from this company.

Anyway, there’s an LED flash provided on the rear-camera of HP Slate8 Pro, as opposed to Nvidia Shield Tablet that doesn’t have it. So taking photo or recording videos at night in low-light situations is definitely more ideal to do with HP Slate8 Pro.

Back to Top

Playing games has always been one of the most favorite things to do on any tablets. It’s no exception with Nvidia Shield Tablet and HP Slate8 Pro.

In fact, thanks to their Tegra processors, these 2 tablets are extremely powerful for playing games.

So you can literally throw any games on any of these devices and they will be more than happier to execute your favorite games in buttery smooth performance, even in full highest graphics.

From simple games like Angry Birds or The Simpson Tapped Out to much heavier and more graphically-demanding titles like Half Life 2 or GTA San Andreas, all can be played perfectly on Nvidia Shield Tablet and HP Slate8 Pro.

As far as hardware is concerned, HP Slate8 Pro comes with a Tegra 4 quad-core processor, coupled with 72-core GeForce ULP GPU. Sadly, it only has 1GB of RAM, which is not huge enough for today’s gaming.

Meanwhile, Nvidia Shield Tablet looks more superior here with the latest and greatest Tegra K1 quad-core processor, accompanied with 192-core Kepler GPU. Not to mention, there’s also 2GB of RAM to provide much smoother multitasking on this device.

In terms of gaming performance, of course Nvidia Shield Tablet has the edge here compared to HP Slate8 Pro. And that’s clearly because its Tegra K1 processor provides more horsepower especially in graphical department.

So no wonder if this tablet has the capability to play not only regular Android games, but also many other console-quality games that are ported straightly from PC/console to Tegra K1 hardware.

There are many games that you can play perfectly on Nvidia Shield Tablet, like: Half Life 2, Portal, Odworld: Stranger’s Wrath, Trine 2, GTA Liberty City, Need for Speed: No Limit (more advanced graphics and visual effects) and many more.

Unfortunately, there’s no Bioshock is available for this tablet because this game is exclusive only for iOS devices.

Besides playing those high-performing Tegra K1 games, you can also throw regular Android games like Modern Combat 5, Asphalt 8: Airborne, NOVA 3, Gangstar Vegas or GTA San Andreas on Nvidia Shield Tablet and this tablet has no problem at all to handle any of these titles.

The same thing also happens to HP Slate8 Pro. Despite using an older-gen Tegra 4 processor, HP Slate8 Pro is still a powerful gaming tablet though.

So you can also play the aforementioned games above, like GTA San Andreas, Modern Combat 5, NOVA 3, Need for Speed No Limits or Asphalt 8: Airborne on this device.

Interestingly, according to what I’ve heard from some random Android gaming websites, Half Life 2 actually can be played on Tegra 4 devices, including HP Slate8 Pro. It goes the same with Portal and Oddworld: Stranger’s Wrath.

Sadly “Trine 2” cannot be played on Tegra 4 tablets. So if you love this 2D platform game, you might want to pick up Nvidia Shield Tablet instead.

Between the 2, of course I will straightly go with Nvidia Shield Tablet because it obviously has better more powerful gaming performance than HP Slate8 Pro.

And it also comes with Nvidia gaming controller (sold separately). So the gaming experience will be more immersive on Nvidia Shield Tablet with this controller.

Not to mention, this tablet is also supported with expandable storage via microSD card slot for up to 128GB. So you can install as many games as you want without deleting the existing files or games on this device, which is awesome.

Even so, HP Slate8 Pro is still a great powerful tablet, especially for gaming. And you can also put many games on this device, thanks to the support of expandable storage via microSD card slot for up to 32GB.

Anyway guys, if you want to know more about their gaming performances, including what games that will run on these tablets, check out my YouTube video playlist or Pinterest page. :)

My Personal Opinions

Well..well.well, we’ve finally come to the final conclusion of this comparison review. So which one gets the crown here in this review? Is it Nvidia Shield Tablet? Or otherwise, is it HP Slate8 Pro?

Okay, both Nvidia Shield Tablet and HP Slate8 Pro are great tablets. No doubt about that. And they are also really amazing for playing games.

They have high-grade specs, they perform really fast and smooth, their cameras take great pictures and overall, they are just great for enjoying media entertainment contents like movies, books or music.

However, as a newer-gen tablet, of course Nvidia Shield Tablet is the one that has more horsepower especially in graphical performance than HP Slate8 Pro.

Not to mention, this Nvidia’s slate is also equipped with an amazing digital pen called “Direct Stylus 2” as well as its own port.

And for your information, the writing experience of DirectStylus 2 on Nvidia Shield Tablet is really awesome and realistic, just like writing on a real paper. In fact, it is on the same level with the S-Pen on Samsung GALAXY Note devices.

So not only can you write some simple notes with Direct Stylus 2, but you can literally create some beautiful paintings out of this digital pen.

However, HP Slate8 Pro is also a top notch performer just like Nvidia Shield Tablet. As a matter of fact, this tablet impressively has better and more efficient battery life than Nvidia’s slate.

So you can play games on this device as long as you want for very long hours.

Bottom line, any of these devices is a really great quality tablet. In fact, they both are still 2 of the best gaming tablets on the market right now.

And the good news is, as I’ve seen lately on Amazon, both of them are currently not very expensive to buy.

Nvidia Shield Tablet with Tegra K1 is now available on Amazon for just $199 for the basic 16GB model. But I heard, this model doesn’t come with stylus, so you need to buy it separately.

Meanwhile, the refurbished model of HP Slate8 Pro can now be had for just $130 on Amazon.

So if you’re still on the street looking for a great reliable gaming tablet, then look no further because Nvidia Shield Tablet and HP Slate8 Pro are 2 tablets you don’t wanna miss.

Anyway, to end this comparison review, let me answer some of the questions I’ve previously asked above:

Which one between Nvidia Shield Tablet and HP Slate8 Pro that deserves to be the best gaming tablet in this comparison review?

They both are actually great powerful gaming tablets. No doubt about that. And HP Slate8 Pro also has the power to run some Tegra K1 games, like Half Life 2, Portal or OddWorld: Stranger’s Wrath. However, if you ask me which one is more powerful, of course it is Nvidia Shield Tablet.

It’s got the latest and greatest Tegra K1 processor, which obviously is way more powerful than Tegra 4 processor found inside HP Slate8 Pro.

And it also offers a lot of great things like amazing digital pen, bigger expandable storage support, bigger RAM, a much sharper display and it also comes with its own specific gaming controller (sold separately).

Which one is the best in the whole aspect?

In the whole aspect, I’ve also got to say that Nvidia Shield Tablet totally grabs the crown here in this regard.

It has an amazing digital pen experience (DirectStylus 2), more powerful gaming performance, better sound quality (dual-speaker grilles), bigger RAM and a much sharper display.

However, HP Slate8 Pro actually also has its own strengths compared to Nvidia Shield Tablet, like its more stronger battery life, higher 8MP rear camera that has LED flash and it also comes with the support of Beats Audio, which makes the gaming experience totally awesome and immersive on this device.

But even so, both Nvidia Shield Tablet and HP Slate8 Pro are equally great quality tablets in the whole aspect.

I mean, they are great for playing games, watching movies, reading books, browsing the web and you can literally do anything with any of these devices.

Is it worth it to buy any of these devices especially to play heavy games?

YES.. yes of course. It’s just no-brainer that any of these 2 devices is really worth it to buy, especially for gaming. You cannot make any mistake if you buy either Nvidia Shield Tablet or HP Slate8 Pro to accommodate your hobby of being a hardcore gamer.

They are AWESOME!!

Pros and Cons

Nvidia Shield Tablet

Pros:
  • an insanely sharp full HD display
  • powerful performance, especially for gaming
  • decent quality cameras
  • amazing digital pen experience just like writing on a real paper
  • good sound quality thanks to dual-speaker grilles
  • pure stock Android UI
  • upgradeable to Android Lollipop
  • elegant design
  • expandable storage wit microSD card slot for up to 128GB
  • it’s really cheap, at just $199
Cons:
  • battery life is average, but could be improved with Lollipop update
  • Tegra K1 processor is really power hungry

HP Slate8 Pro

Pros:
  • a sharp display (almost full HD resolution)
  • microSD card slot support for up to 32GB
  • decent quality cameras, especially the rear one
  • powerful gaming performance
  • great screen aspect ratio
  • solid battery life
  • pure stock Android UI with less customizations
  • LED flash on its rear-camera
  • it’s cheap right now (refurbished is around $140, which is totally worth it)
Cons:
  • Tegra 4 processor is usually plagued with overheating issue
  • there’s no stylus just like its sibling, HP Slate7 Extreme
  • it only has 1GB of RAM

Disclaimer: Hi guys, bear in mind that this is not some in-depth review. This is Read more...

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